50 years of Watergate: the scandal that forever changed American politics

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A burglary inside the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington’s Watergate office complex in June 1972 turned into a high-profile political scandal that resulted in the resignation of President Richard Nixon two years later. in August 1974.

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Friday, June 17 marked fifty years since the Watergate scandal, which led to the downfall of US President Richard Nixon in 1974. Here are the historic headlines displayed in the lobby of the Los Angeles Times Building. Wikimedia Commons.

A June 1972 break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters led to an investigation that uncovered multiple abuses of power by then-President Richard Nixon that ultimately forced him to resign on August 9, 1974. AP File

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A June 1972 break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters led to an investigation that uncovered multiple abuses of power by then-President Richard Nixon that ultimately forced him to resign on August 9, 1974. AP File

Named in the Watergate scandal are left to right: G Gordon Liddy, White House attorney John W. Dean III, former Attorney General John N. Mitchell and former Nixon deputy campaign manager Jeb Stuart Magruder.  AP file

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Named in the Watergate scandal are left to right: G Gordon Liddy, White House attorney John W. Dean III, former Attorney General John N. Mitchell and former Nixon deputy campaign manager Jeb Stuart Magruder. AP file

Evidence of the infamous burglary at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate Office Building in Washington, June 17, 1972. AFP file

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Evidence of the infamous burglary at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate Office Building in Washington, June 17, 1972. AFP file

Police evidence of the Watergate break-in at the <a class=United States National Archives. The home directory belonging to burglar Bernard Barker containing the HH entry for Howard Hunt (top right), who made the direct connection to Hunt and the White House, is seen here. .AFP file” title=”Police evidence of the Watergate break-in at the United States National Archives. The home directory belonging to burglar Bernard Barker containing the HH entry for Howard Hunt (top right), who made the direct connection to Hunt and the White House, is seen here. .AFP file”/>

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Police evidence of the Watergate break-in at the United States National Archives. The home directory belonging to burglar Bernard Barker containing the HH entry for Howard Hunt (top right), who made the direct connection to Hunt and the White House, is seen here. .AFP file

Evidence, a transistor radio, of the Watergate break-in on display at the Gerald R Ford Presidential Museum.  Wikimedia Commons/Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum

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Evidence, a transistor radio, of the Watergate break-in on display at the Gerald R Ford Presidential Museum. Wikimedia Commons/Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum

A photograph of an aerial view of the Watergate East and Watergate West office building in Washington, DC.  .AFP file

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A photograph of an aerial view of the Watergate East and Watergate West office building in Washington, DC. .AFP file

US members of the House of Representatives listen to recordings from the Nixon White House on August 7, 1974 in Washington DC.  .AFP file

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US members of the House of Representatives listen to recordings from the Nixon White House on August 7, 1974 in Washington DC. .AFP file

Washington Post writers Carl Bernstein, left, and Robert Woodward, who pushed the Watergate investigation on May 7, 1973. AP file

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Washington Post writers Carl Bernstein, left, and Robert Woodward, who pushed the Watergate investigation on May 7, 1973. AP file

Demonstrators in Washington DC demanding the impeachment of Richard Nixon, January 1974. AFP file

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Demonstrators in Washington DC demanding the impeachment of Richard Nixon, January 1974. AFP file

View of the House Judiciary Committee discussing the Watergate impeachment process on July 24, 1974, at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC.  .AFP file

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View of the House Judiciary Committee discussing the Watergate impeachment process on July 24, 1974, at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC. .AFP file

File photo showing the late US President Richard Nixon (R) with Vice President Gerald R Ford who went on to assume the nation's highest office after the former's resignation.  He later pardoned Nixon for all charges related to the Watergate affair on August 8, 1974. AFP file

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File photo showing the late US President Richard Nixon (R) with Vice President Gerald R Ford who went on to assume the nation’s highest office after the former’s resignation. He later pardoned Nixon for all charges related to the Watergate affair on August 8, 1974. AFP file

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